Categories


Subscribe

Make: Steel-Cut Oatmeal

Make: Steel-Cut Oatmeal

A few weeks back, steel-cut oats were on sale for a screaming deal at Sprouts Farmer's Market. I couldn't resist, I bought what could be considered a lifetime supply. Even though I have childhood memories of Grandma Millie forcing me to lick my oatmeal bowl clean, I still have hopes for oatmeal: it's nutrient-packed, easy to make, inexpensive, and there's gotta be a delicious way to prepare it. Grandma Millie always served rolled oats; I like the texture and crunch of steel-cut (and the fact that they aren't in my Rolodex of recurring nightmares).

The only bummer about steel-cut oats is they take a long time to cook. First, I tried preparing them overnight in a slow cooker. Second, I tried getting up early and letting them simmer about 40 minutes. In both instances, I was disappointed: the oatmeal had a chalky aftertaste that was highly unappealing.

But here I was, stuck with all these bags of steel-cut oats. I was determined to find a delicious way to prepare them.

My research led me to this recipe from the blog Two Thirds Cup. Thank you Katie, your recipe has fulfilled my steel-cut oatmeal dreams. First, the long cook time problem is solved: she has you soak the oats overnight so that when you wake up, they need only 5 minutes to cook. Second, the bad aftertaste disappeared: adding lemon juice to the overnight soaking water and rinsing the oats before boiling got rid of the chalky taste. I'm happy and my kids' bellies are full. (Although they prefer cereal and milk, of course.)

My favorite oatmeal toppings are: roasted pecans, cinnamon, pure maple syrup, banana slices, raisins, butter, milk. Bon Appétit!

 A bowl of dry, steel-cut oats.

A bowl of dry, steel-cut oats.

Get: Gerry Down Jacket

Get: Gerry Down Jacket

Go: Tahoe Cabins

Go: Tahoe Cabins